Wednesday 19 April 2017

Removing Chips from a Plastic CNC Router


An application in need of a method to collect plastic chips from the CNC router tables shown above.  These machines are used for precision cutting, but face a problem when the cutting edge of the machine comes into contact with the chips and debris created during normal use.
The end user had considered a blow off device such as a nozzle or Air Knife, but this raised concerns with material collection.  Ideally, the customer of this application wanted to be able to capture the chips and debris for recycling.
So, By looking into a method of removing the chips with a Line Vac, conveying the debris to a stationary drum for collection and recycling.  This type of solution has proven to be effective many times in the past, as shown in the image below. A Line Vac can be mounted at the cutting head to vacuum chips and debris as they are created by the cutting process.
Vivek Engineers#22, 1st Floor, 1st Cross, Adj. to IIMB Compound, Bilekahalli Indl. Area, 
Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore - 560 076.
Ph : 080 -  2648 1309, 3297 0358, 4170 1145
TeleFax : 080- 2648 1309.
E- mail : [email protected][email protected] , [email protected]

Tuesday 18 April 2017

Super Ion Air Knife Removes Foil Dots In Lid Cutting Operation

In a food manufacturer about a packaging line they were having issues with.  The plant fills continuous rows of thermo-formed cups which is then sealed with a single foil lid. Once sealed, a machine cuts the row to separate the cups, which creates small scrap pieces of foil. After the cutting operation, they try to collect as much of the waste trim as possible but some small pieces of foil, they call “dots”, cling to the surface of the cup and cutter due to static charge.  The company installed a vacuum collection hood in this area, to try and help keep the foil pieces or any dust from falling onto the cup during the process. While this did help somewhat, some dots would remain and eventually fall off further down the line, making small piles that needed to be manually cleaned to avoid potential jams, which slowed down their production cycle.

The cups are filled and separated on a 44″ wide, mesh-screen conveyor with individual lanes to process multiple rows of cups. After being cut, the cups are moved to the inspection area and then packaged for shipment.  I recommended they mount a 48″ Super Ion Air Knife above and below the cups and direct the airflow to the end where the vacuum collection hood is located. The idea is, as the ions eliminate the charge, the small foil dots will release and the laminar airflow would keep the parts moving toward the vacuum hood, thus removing all foil trim and preventing any piling of trim further down the production line.
Vivek Engineers#22, 1st Floor, 1st Cross, Adj. to IIMB Compound, Bilekahalli Indl. Area, 
Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore - 560 076.
Ph : 080 -  2648 1309, 3297 0358, 4170 1145
TeleFax : 080- 2648 1309.
E- mail : [email protected][email protected]

Wednesday 12 April 2017

Cooling Nylon Parts and Brushes with the Adjustable Spot Cooler


A robotics company called to Exair looking for a recommendation for a cooling device to use in their nylon plastic machining operation. They have a six axis robot, fitted with abrasive brushes, that “cleans” the part profiles as they are being moved from the milling area to the inspection location. The brushes were effective in removing the fines and particulate from the parts but they were starting to experience an increase in the amount of rejects as the brushes were generating heat, causing deformities to the profile.
Their initial thought was to use a liquid type method of cooling but with the parts having some small recesses and cavities that might trap fluid, this wasn’t going to be a reliable option for them. Another area of concern with using an air cooling device, was if the airflow was too forceful, the smaller parts they process may have the potential to “move” while being held by the robotic arm which could scratch or blemish the part.
After further conversation about the process, Exair's Application Engineer recommended they use our Adjustable Spot Cooler in the application. The Adjustable Spot Cooler incorporates a Vortex Tube to produce a cold airstream as low as -30°F with an ambient air supply temperature. Using the temperature control valve, they can easily adjust the temperature drop and the volume (SCFM) of air being exhausted, to “dial” in the device to provide an adequate level of cooling while controlling the outlet flow to not disrupt the hold on the part itself. With the integral magnetic base and flexible tubing, they could easily mount the unit to the arm of the robot while directing the cold air to blow across the brushes and the part to keep them cool.
Vivek Engineers#22, 1st Floor, 1st Cross, Adj. to IIMB Compound, Bilekahalli Indl. Area, 
Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore - 560 076.
Ph : 080 -  2648 1309, 3297 0358, 4170 1145
TeleFax : 080- 2648 1309.
E- mail : [email protected][email protected] , [email protected]